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1. Victim Support

Ongoing training of law enforcement, health workers, educators and other professionals is instrumental in supporting victims and responding effectively to sexual violence. Such efforts to address sexual violence are particularly effective when these community resources work collaboratively to coordinate assistance for victims and create change. Research has proven that victims are more likely to go to the police and agree to criminal prosecution if they have a supportive advocate, meaning that victims are always put first. When police units, prosecutors and courts have expertise in sexual violence the result is often a better outcomes for victims.

2. Sexual Violence Education

Effective and comprehensive sexual assault prevention education programs must be implemented early and sustained, ideally beginning in elementary school and continuing through high school. These programs will not only help victims heal and thrive better than those who did not receive preventative education, but are more likely to prevent sexual violence in the first place.

3. Community Support

Raising local, regional and national awareness about rape and sexual violence of primary and secondary school children will build a sphere of understanding and compassion and ideally lead to prevention. With the committed involvement of communities, parents, students, educators, law enforcement, health professionals and other stakeholders, we can spread the message, and also help to positively impact the campaign’s critical mission of awareness, education, assistance and prevention. Raising awareness will also help provide us with state and federal funding that we will need to support education for schools, health providers, advocacy centers, and the justice system. We must protect our children from sexual assault. We absolutely cannot afford to wait.

Articles

Articles about rape in Secondary Schools

  • Activists Take Aim At High Schools For Mishandling Sexual Assault
  • High Schools and Middle Schools Are Failing Victims of Sexual Assault
  • In handling rape, high schools are worse than colleges

State of Vermont program for secondary schools

Best Practice for Implementing & Sustaining Comprehensive Sexual Violence Prevention in Schools

Senator Kirsten Gillibrand Bill’s

There have been three bills submitted by New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand to support secondary schools

Section 2101(c)(4)(B)(xvi) ‹ Allows state educational agencies to use Title II-A professional development funds to train school personnel (teachers, principals, paraprofessionals and others) regarding how to recognize and prevent child sexual abuse.

Section 2103(b)(4)(O) ‹ Allows local educational agencies to use Title II-A professional development funds to develop, implement and evaluate programs to provide school personnel (teachers, principals, paraprofessionals and others) with training regarding how to recognize and prevent child sexual abuse.

Section 4105(a)(4)(S) ‹ Allows local educational agencies to use Title IV-A Safe and Healthy Students funds to develop, implement and evaluate programs and activities related to child sexual abuse awareness and prevention. Such programs and activities could include age-appropriate and developmentally-appropriate instruction for students in child sexual abuse awareness and prevention, including how to safely report child sexual abuse. Such programs and activities could also include information for parents and guardians regarding how to recognize child sexual abuse and how to discuss such abuse with a child.